do-black-people-do-stuff:

undersizedcynic:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

missespeon:

benepla:

iwillfuckingkillyou12:

Feminists think Anti-Feminists hate Women/have Internalized Misogyny.

But, compare the way that we treat Women and how Feminists treat everyone in general.

this is a bad post so it’s mine now. reblog with the character you regular as in super smash bros. i like toon link.

Marth is good but I prefer characters who can jump great distances like Kirby and meta knight.

pikachu and yoshi are faves of mine. also peach

i’m really good with peach but i also really enjoy playing as wario

Kirby is the best

I always play with Zelda. Fav. 

extendedburning:

godtxt:

please do not let ferguson die out like everything else big does. do not let this die out. do not let this continue on for three days and then everyone forget about it. do not let this happen.

queue this post up 3 days from now, a week from now, a month from now, a month from then. make sure even if you forget your blog will remember.

(Source: pluralglados, via port-o-bella)

rachelbearenson:

so turns out the guy who discovered uranus originally wanted to name it “george”

just. imagine a planet called George

mercury venus earth jupiter saturn GEORGE

A bit of a misconception. The man you’re thinking of is William Herschel. He proposed the planet be named “The Georgium Sidus” or “The Georgian Star” after King George of England, who was his patron. “George”, in reference to a monarch, would have been too casual, and was never really on the table. 

Obviously, all non-English astronomers weren’t on board with that name, which is why it didn’t pan out. Others proposed that the planet actually be named HERSCHEL after the man who found the planet. (Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Herschel. Lol)  It was almost called Neptune, since we hadn’t found the planet that would eventually be named Neptune yet. But since Saturn is the father of Jupiter in Roman myth, Uranus, father of Saturn, was chosen. 

Also a fun fact, they way we pronounce Uranus is so unfortunate because it was ultimately picked by Johann Bode, a German astronomer. So the fact that the pronunciation “Ur-ANUS” is awkward in English (Or the equally awkward “URINE-us”) never occurred to him.  The original Greek pronunciation, which is much LESS awkward (and we should use?) is OO-RAN-OOS. 

(via alykapediaaa)

fjordfish:

buckythirteen:

If anyone ever suggests to you that you should read Catcher in the Rye:

Don’t

You

Dare

Save yourself precious reading time and just. Just don’t. I wasted a week on that book. A week of reading comprehension I will never get back.

Don’t bother with it. You wanna know…

I wonder: I think I was blinded by my own depression and couldn’t see how his negativity was abnormal because it was normal for me. Curious if this perception of the story has affected anyone else?

I was in a pretty bad mental space when I read the novel (which did not help) and so I couldn’t pick up on any kind of “lost/alone” feelings in the boom because for years that was my baseline. I couldn’t tell any difference between my existence and his at that ~feeling~ level, not much anyway, and so it read to me like just some whiny kid.

Since reading it I’ve heard a lot of people who like it speak about it. I still feel like I had a fairly unique perspective while reading it.
Maybe one day I’ll go back to it.

Allow me to piggy back off of that thought? 

I think it’s kind of sad how often Holden is read as just some whiny kid by readers when he’s also kind of written off as a whiny kid by many of the characters in the books.

And we know that shortly after this awful weekend he ends up in a mental hospital. Ya know? Like, there’s a reading of this book that deals with mental illness that I think is too often ignored because we EXPECT teenagers to be broody and whiny, and we accept this narrative of teenagers being annoying pissy complainers. 

When, like, Holden isn’t just some brat. Holden is on the verge of a mental break down, desperately seeking out some kind of help or connection but unable to vocalize or recognize the kind of help he needs to avoid the oncoming meltdown he’d about to have. 

He’d just been kicked out of his 4th high school, he’s considering running away from home, getting into fights, making impulsive, dangerous choices. This isn’t typical brat teenage behavior. This is mental illness spiraling out of control. This is Holden, lost and alone, trying to connect and failing terribly at it. 

buckythirteen:

If anyone ever suggests to you that you should read Catcher in the Rye:

Don’t

You

Dare

Save yourself precious reading time and just. Just don’t. I wasted a week on that book. A week of reading comprehension I will never get back.

Don’t bother with it. You wanna know what happens? I’ll tell you what happens:

Jack

Fucking

Shit

-disgruntled English major huff-

Hey now. 

Ok, you’re allowed to not like Catcher. Like, how you feel about books is your own thing and all.

But I want to talk about Catcher now. Because I really like Catcher. I do, honestly. 

Cuz, like…the point of Catcher isn’t really….WHAT happens, it’s HOW the Narrator talks about what happens. It’s a novel about the relationship between narration and narrator, between reader and narrator, between narrator and character. 

Because, yeah. The plot is…Holden, while at a mental hospital, tells the reader about how he had farted around for a weekend and tried to talk to people and failed miserably at pretty much every attempt back before he had been admitted for treatment. Like, after getting kicked out of school, Holden wanders around the city asking cab drivers and sex workers and hotel bell hops about where the ducks go when the ponds freeze in winter and absolutely NO ONE will answer his questions. He’s lost and alone, and he feels lost and alone, and we KNOW that it’s going to end with him in a mental hospital because that’s where NARRATOR Holden is telling us the story from.

But the BOOK isn’t about a teenager farting around for a weekend. The book is ABOUT a young man trying to express how he felt on the lowest point of his life just before he had to go to a mental hospital, this weekend where he felt the most completely disconnected from the world around him. Unable to get a single person to listen to him for even a second, the strain of which we infer caused him to be hospitalized. Yet that same character now is able to tell YOU, the reader, for the ENTIRE NOVEL, about his experiences, bridging the gap of communication that had plagued him in the first place. Holden, after all he’s been through, is talking to YOU, and you are listening to him. 

It’s a novel about an immature young man who feels disillusioned and alone and disconnected, but the narrator is not the same as the character, and we have to bridge that gap. We have to wonder WHY he always wears that red cap (it’s a security blanket), or why he’s so worried about the damn ducks and where they will go when the ponds freeze (because he too is at a turning point in his life but does not see a destination.) We have to understand why THIS weekend is important. 

I understand people who do not see the appeal in Catcher. Holden complains and comes off as rather spoiled at times, and yes, not a whole lot happens. (Plus, Holden  has some offensive moments in the books. Particularly with his conversation with Luce as I recall. It’s been a while since I read it though.) But ultimately, it’s a book about isolation and coming of age, and language, and mental illness, and trying to bridge the gaps of communication that can make us feel alone. 

And I think that writing off a novel like that because “Jack fucking shit” happens in it undervalues what DOES happen in it in a lot of ways. 

brutereason:

thelethifoldwitch:

Val was adopted. Her dad, lovely though he was, wasn’t really her dad. She didn’t know who really was though, and her dad was kind, even if she refused to call him “dad”.
She’d never known why he’d fought so hard adopt her. She was the weird kid at the foster home, the one weird stuff happened around, the one who’d managed to warn Gemma that there was an adder by her foot, and managed to tease the adder away. 
(She made things vanish too, though she didn’t know where they went. She could get them to come back, sometimes.)
But Dudley had fought for her, said that yes, the other children were perfectly lovely but Valerian Makepeace was something else, something, he said, pointing to her empty file, no other parents had seemed prepared to accept.
Val was a child Dudley Dursley fought to adopt, and adopt her he did. When things went missing he was never angry. When odd things happened he never demanded to know what had occurred. When the snake crawled up his leg and only Val could get it off he just nodded and said, “just like Harry you are.”
She didn’t really know who Harry was. 
But when, that summer, the year she turned 11, an owl landed on her windowsill, holding a letter in its beak, Dudley smiled. “Just like Harry you are,” he said again.
He explained about magic - or what little he could. Explained how his cousin - no, he wasn’t in contact with Harry much anymore, just that odd moving Christmas card each year - could do magic. Explained how there was a place in London, Diagonally, where she could get the things on the list, if she wanted to go.
Val wanted to go.
Dudley sent a letter to his cousin. The address (Godric’s Hollow, what a funny name, Val thought) neatly written and the letter quickly responded to. A barn owl (named Wendelin, apparently) came with a letter saying to go to a particular corner in London, where Harry would meet them.
Meet them he did, him and his whole family, and extended family, red head after red head, and Harry standing dark haired among them all, two dark haired boys, bickering beside him.
"Val are you?" he said, bending a bit so his eyes, dancing and green, were at her height. "It’s alright, I didn’t know what was going on when I was told. You’re a witch. Have you ever done strange things before?"
Val nodded because she had, though she’d always hesitated to call them magic.
"It’s alright. Would you like me to show you how to do something else strange?"
Val nodded because this was an adult not just, as dad did, accepting the strangeness, but asking for it. When she tapped the bricks, lifted by Dudley so she could reach the top one, she didn’t expect anything to happen.
But they moved.
Behind her the army of redheads cheered, and as her dad lifted her down and touched a kiss to her hair she smiled, properly, widely, as she handed the wand back.
She knew what she was now.
(Image Source)
(Idea of Dudley having a muggle-born Slytherin daughter from ninnieamee)

I just…want to read the entire seven-book series.

brutereason:

thelethifoldwitch:

Val was adopted. Her dad, lovely though he was, wasn’t really her dad. She didn’t know who really was though, and her dad was kind, even if she refused to call him “dad”.

She’d never known why he’d fought so hard adopt her. She was the weird kid at the foster home, the one weird stuff happened around, the one who’d managed to warn Gemma that there was an adder by her foot, and managed to tease the adder away. 

(She made things vanish too, though she didn’t know where they went. She could get them to come back, sometimes.)

But Dudley had fought for her, said that yes, the other children were perfectly lovely but Valerian Makepeace was something else, something, he said, pointing to her empty file, no other parents had seemed prepared to accept.

Val was a child Dudley Dursley fought to adopt, and adopt her he did. When things went missing he was never angry. When odd things happened he never demanded to know what had occurred. When the snake crawled up his leg and only Val could get it off he just nodded and said, “just like Harry you are.”

She didn’t really know who Harry was. 

But when, that summer, the year she turned 11, an owl landed on her windowsill, holding a letter in its beak, Dudley smiled. “Just like Harry you are,” he said again.

He explained about magic - or what little he could. Explained how his cousin - no, he wasn’t in contact with Harry much anymore, just that odd moving Christmas card each year - could do magic. Explained how there was a place in London, Diagonally, where she could get the things on the list, if she wanted to go.

Val wanted to go.

Dudley sent a letter to his cousin. The address (Godric’s Hollow, what a funny name, Val thought) neatly written and the letter quickly responded to. A barn owl (named Wendelin, apparently) came with a letter saying to go to a particular corner in London, where Harry would meet them.

Meet them he did, him and his whole family, and extended family, red head after red head, and Harry standing dark haired among them all, two dark haired boys, bickering beside him.

"Val are you?" he said, bending a bit so his eyes, dancing and green, were at her height. "It’s alright, I didn’t know what was going on when I was told. You’re a witch. Have you ever done strange things before?"

Val nodded because she had, though she’d always hesitated to call them magic.

"It’s alright. Would you like me to show you how to do something else strange?"

Val nodded because this was an adult not just, as dad did, accepting the strangeness, but asking for it. When she tapped the bricks, lifted by Dudley so she could reach the top one, she didn’t expect anything to happen.

But they moved.

Behind her the army of redheads cheered, and as her dad lifted her down and touched a kiss to her hair she smiled, properly, widely, as she handed the wand back.

She knew what she was now.

(Image Source)

(Idea of Dudley having a muggle-born Slytherin daughter from ninnieamee)

I just…want to read the entire seven-book series.

(via port-o-bella)

thingsfortwwings:

[Image: Sam Wilson and Steve Rogers about to kiss; they’re wearing their uniforms, and Sam has pushed Steve’s cowl up off his head.]
maskedfangirl:

Cap and Falcon in color palette #29 for doodledinmypants!

thingsfortwwings:

[Image: Sam Wilson and Steve Rogers about to kiss; they’re wearing their uniforms, and Sam has pushed Steve’s cowl up off his head.]

maskedfangirl:

Cap and Falcon in color palette #29 for doodledinmypants!

(via whichwitchery)

asheathes:

WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: MEXICO

Disguised as a Mayan ruin in the jungles of Chiapas, the Mexican School for Enriched Magical Studies is a sturdy moss-covered structure blanketed by lush greenery. The students are no strangers to muggle tourists ambling about, and will often pose as fellow tourists or locals and interact with them, making them one of the most outgoing, lively, and tolerant communities in the wizarding world. For festivals, students like to don vibrant headdresses, and the school becomes a kaleidoscope of colour as girls twirl around like tops, their skirts lifting up into the air, filling empty space with colour and painting the school with embellished splendour. The campus often reverberates with music from the school’s ghost mariachi band who plays cheerfully day and night; although it tends to get annoying at times, the constant activity makes the school feel like home.

fallingivy:

It bothered me that there were no Squibs allowed in Hogwarts. Fine, I can get that Squibs would not be able to do any wand magic, and would not be able to fly a broomstick. They still apparently possess enough innate magic to see the school and other magically hidden locations. Out of the classes at Hogwarts that the kids take, a Squib could take and benefit from the following classes: History of Magic, Astronomy, Divination, Care of Magical Creatures, Herbology, MUGGLE STUDIES, Potions (there will be little foolish wand-waving here), Arithmancy, Ancient Runes, and partially theoretical classes on Defense Against the Dark Arts and Charms.


That’s a long list of classes. And some of them are particularly upsetting to me because there’s stuff like History of Magic being left out- that’s their own history they’re being barred from learning. Since Squibs are often forced into the Muggle world, a Squib would make an ideal Muggle Studies teacher and would no doubt be able to teach a more realistic and informative class than someone going off of biased wizarding texts. Squib kids looking into living in the Muggle world would absolutely benefit from learning Muggle studies, especially if they’re from a mainly pureblood family who doesn’t venture out all too often.


And then there’s the rest of them! Arguably you could have a Squib gifted with prescience, and Divination is supposed to be a very accessible branch of magic. Squibs being excellent at taking care of magical plants and animals and making groundbreaking advancements, Squibs working in tandem with each other to breed different magical herbs for potions, Squib potion masters creating all sorts of amazing concoctions. Squibs working with muggleborns and using logic and science to advance magic theoretically, Squibs being huge pro-muggleborn/pro-muggle advocates, Squibs making star charts and Squibs going into the muggle world to use their healing potions in their jobs as nurses and doctors.

Squibs being so completely shut out of magical education was such a sore point for me in the books, especially viewing the treatment of our only prominent Squib- an angry, bitter, glorified janitor often at the mercy of brats with wands. I’m not justifying or endorsing his abusiveness at all, but this was an awful character to use to explore people without magic in a society that bases your worth on it. A lot of time Rowling seems to validate Wizarding prejudices more than she challenges them. While I really enjoy reading the headcanons about Hogwarts being very accessible to people with disabilities, I can’t bring myself to see that as the case with Squibs being treated as they are. 

(via bisexualsteve)

hanelizel:

if anyone so much as breathes on the Athena Parthenos these two will fuck shit up. 

hanelizel:

if anyone so much as breathes on the Athena Parthenos these two will fuck shit up. 

(via cedarleaf)

"ineffable
[in-ef-uh-buhl]"

(adjective) In the list of one of the most 100 beautiful words in the English language, ineffable’s beauty lies in its flowing sound and meaning. Ineffable describes the sentiment of being unable to express something in words because it is too extreme to communicate; words cannot possibly do justice at this particular moment.  (via wordsnquotes)

(via skelerenn)

OH MY POOR SHIPPER HEART!!

abelnightroad-inside-thetardis:

I can’t even choose any more! 

I ship fuckin’ Percy with Annabeth so hard, I ship him with fucking Nico so hard too!

I ship Jason with Piper so hard too, but sadly I ship Jasico way to hard!

    Percabeth *rips hair out* Percico *sobs in corner* JasonxPiper (still don’t know their ship name) Jasico *yells really loud and sobs so loudly!*

                          OH KILL ME NOW!!! 

Have you considered: ~Polyamory~?